JIE Seminar: A PERVASIVE APPROACH TO CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER (CSP) HARVESTING: FROM MICROMIRROR ARRAYS TO MECHATRONIC SOLAR TILES (STILEs)

Updated : October 28, 2015
Press release by Yingneng Gu

Date

November 6 (Friday), 2015

Time

 3:50-5:30 pm

Venue

Lecture Hall, 1/F, JIE Building

Presenter

Dr. Serhan M. Ardanuç, Cornell University (USA)

Host

Dr. Kai Wang from JIE iSense Laboratory

Topic

A PERVASIVE APPROACH TO CONCENTRATED SOLAR POWER (CSP) HARVESTING: FROM MICROMIRROR ARRAYS TO MECHATRONIC SOLAR TILES (STILEs)

Abstract

Conventional, utility-scale, concentrated solar power (CSP) plants use large-area heliostats, parabolic troughs, or dish collectors that are not only heavy and bulky, but also require significant labor for installation, and maintenance infrastructure. Since these large-area structures require large clearance over the ground surface to track the sun, their form factors are not suitable for low-profile, roof-mountable systems. As such, they have not found much use beyond utility-scale solar power plants that are manufactured in deserts or vast open plains. Photovoltaic systems and flat-plate solar collectors on the other hand, have dominated the roof-top, residential/commercial installations with their low-profile, modular structure, and ease of installation.

Addressing the above issues of traditional, bulky CSP collectors, I will introduce the Solar TILE (STILE) technology, which presents a modular, scalable, and portable approach to heliostats in tower-based central receiver systems. In the first part of my talk, I will present our work on off-chip position control of arrays of micro-mirrors with dimensions of 180×100 μm2 using Ultrasound Enhanced Electrostatic Batch Assembly, and how we achieve 3D complexity from 2D released (free-to-move) microstructures with yields up to 100%. In the second part of my talk, I will extend the scaling argument of mirror arrays to millimeter and centimeter-scale to enable realization of low-profile, light-weight, sun-tracking STILEs that can be wirelessly controlled to reflect the incident solar energy to a central receiver using mostly off-the-shelf parts.

Introduction of Serhan M. Ardanuç, Ph.D.

Dr. Ardanuç is a research associate at Cornell University and a cofounder of Suntomics Inc., an Ithaca, NY based company. He received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara, Turkey in 2001, and his Ph.D. degree in 2010 from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY with a minor in theoretical and applied mechanics. His research interests include array based microsystems, analog/digital circuit design, behavioral/finite-element simulations, applications of embedded, millimeter scale reflector platforms to concentrated solar power harvesting, and ultrasonic transduction of microsystems using piezoelectric materials.He has >25 peer-reviewed publications, 2 patents, and 6 pending patent applications in the field of micro/nano systems, and concentrating solar energy harvesting technologies. Serhan is also a recipient of Cornell McMullen Fellowship and a co-author of the best student paper in 2010 IEEE NEMS Conference and 2014 IEEE Ultrasonic Symposium.